Nothing I’ve
ever done
has given me
more joys
and rewards
than being a
father to my children.

Bill Cosby
May 2011 VOLUME 28 NUMBER 5



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BOSTON TOWNSHIP

MEMORIAL DAY May 30, 2011: Valley Fire will be providing coffee and doughnuts at 9:00AM at the Township’s service garage at the corner of Main and Riverview. At 10:00 a memorial service will be held at the Library The parade begins at 11:00AM and heads toward Cedar Grove Cemetery. Following this service another service begins at the Boston Cemetery. In between the two services, Cornerstone Church located at the intersection of Hines Hill and Boston Mills, will provide water, lemonade, and hot dogs for all. They also have a wonderful bake sale.

BRUSH CHIPPING: Brush chipping for township residents will be the first Monday of each month. Please remember to place your branches at the curb and away from mailboxes. No root balls please.

ZONING: The Trustees are seeking an alternate member for the zoning commission. If you are interested, please send a letter of interest with your background information to P.O. Box 123, Peninsula, OH 44264.

WEBSITE: Visit our website at www.bostontownship.org to find up to date Township information.

Contact numbers for the trustees: Amy Anderson: 330-657-2439, Randy Bergdorf: 330-655-5698, and Jerry Ritch: 330-657-2015. Fiscal Officer Joanne Noragon: 330-657-2059, Road Department Tim Tesmer and Doug Mayer: 330-657-2600, and Zoning inspector, Larry Sulzer: 330-657-2135.





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BOSTON TOWNSHIP BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION
SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 2011


11:00AM to 5:00PM at the Woodridge Intermediate School grounds on Bronson Avenue. There will be craft booths, informational booths, food booths, dunk tank, children’s activities, fire truck, antique cars, antique tractors, and fire & police demonstrations.

6:00PM to midnight at the Boston Township Hall at the corner of Main and Riverview. There will be food vendors, music in the garage and hall, dancing, a town hall plaque dedication, wine and cheese reception and a quilt block auction, quilt and quilt block raffle drawing, along with a beer truck, bonfire, and fireworks.

For more information, call (330) 657-2059 or visit the township website at www.bostontownship.org





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PENINSULA COUNCIL

The Village Council held their regular meeting on May 9, 2011 at the Village Hall. The first part was a joint meeting with the Boston Township Trustees. The Council and the Trustees all voted unanimously to approve the inside milage appropriation for the Cemetery.

The Fiscal Officer gave an update on the State Budget to the Council members. As of the date of the meeting the proposed cuts to the Local Government Funds distributed to the Village and all municipalities were still a part of the package.

Council passed legislation authorizing an agreement with the Summit County Engineer for the resurfacing of Akron Peninsula Road. The total cost of the project is $372,000 but the Village will not have to pay any of the cost. The entire amount will be paid by the County.

Councilperson Mary Booth announced a meeting on May 16th of the Player’s Barn Committee to discuss issues relating to the property.

The Council also voted to accept two grants from the Northeastern Ohio Public Energy Corporation. One was for traffic lights and the other was for replacement windows at the Village Hall. Council congratulated Ms. Booth for all of her hard work in procuring these grants.

An ordinance requiring residents to remove hazardous obstacles arising on their properties was deferred until the next meeting on June 13, 2011 at 7:00PM.

Check the Library, Post Office, Village Hall, Terry Lumber and Woodridge Intermediate School for posting.

Police Department – Non emergency Police and Fire Department - 330-657-2911
Mayor and Court - 330-657-2151
Fiscal Office/Zoning - 330-657-2714
Service Department - 330-657-2089

John D. Steigel
Fiscal Officer





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VILLAGE CHIPPING

Due to equipment failure, there will be no chipping in the Village until further notice.





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THE REAL PROBLEM WITH THE PARK

Our problem has long roots—all the way back to 1975, when John Seiberling tracked down the vacationing President Ford and presented him with a list of supporters of a bill creating the Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area. It was a bill that neither the National Park Service nor the President wanted to sign. That list was overloaded with the president’s financial campaign backers. Ford was a savvy politician; he signed the bill. What followed was destruction of homes and farms under the stewardship of the Park’s first superintendent, Bill Birdsell. That should never be forgotten. That was a piece of bad history and the community is still dealing with the financial consequences.

That consequence, the non-taxable Park property real estate valuation of 34 million dollars, is a lot of lost revenue that could repair our residential roads, provide more police, fire and EMS protection. Big sigh. Well, it is what it is. You’re here. You’re part of the community. Russell Baker wrote a little essay about a community in which residents are described as “from here or come here.” The park has been here more than thirty-five years; you’d think the community would have more of a sense of their belonging. But we don’t. Why not?

Let’s leapfrog over Bill and all those properties now owned by USA to what we have today. A Park and a Park Conservancy that has kept its property and remaining buildings tidy. The houses are well maintained, pleasant rental properties, large visitor and education centers. Two major sewer lines have been installed….

Hold the phone. Millions have been spent renovating and upgrading properties that sat empty for years; millions have been spent installing sewers. Projects such as this not only take money, they take the same kind of clout and chutzpah John Seiberling had in Vale in 1976, with his list and his bill. Advocates.

The tax paying citizens of this community and its elected officials have long been advocates for the progress of the community. What they lack is the list of major advocates. Not we everyday Mom, home and apple pie advocates; our voice and influence are not enough. Not enough to convince Hudson, Stow and Cuyahoga Falls to structure a JEDZ that does not penalize our JEDD district. Not enough to convince Cuyahoga Falls to advocate sanitary sewers for the Akron Cleveland JEDD. Not enough to convince Summit County to support the Township to finance sewers. Not enough to have our grant applications for improvements considered. We need advocates whose influence goes beyond county and state to national bounds. After all, those two sewers were built with national money.

This is a challenge to the Cuyahoga Valley National Park and its Conservancy: help us. You’re part of the community, you’re not going away and we’re not going away. Take an interest in the rest of the community. That you hold the majority of the income producing property is not your fault, and it is our problem. Our budget is a speck on this paper compared to yours and totally inadequate to advance our infrastructure. But there is money out there. You used some of it to build the Stanford Road sewer. Become an advocate for the rest of your community.

Endorse our local officials and their projects to improve our non-federal properties. You understand our problem. You are running an enterprise that has made the community unable to fund itself. That is no fault of the local park officials and employees. But you are part of the community and you have a contribution to make. I hope you step up.

Joanne Noragon





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To the Boston Township road crew:

We appreciate your hard work clearing the street of our fallen tree. Thank you for getting the limbs/branches organized for pick-up. You saved us a lot of time and effort. Well done - thank you!!!!

Diane & Ray Hach





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WILL BOSTON TOWNSHIP SURVIVE PART II

Back at the inception of the Cuyahoga Valley Park in 1975, many of us in the township asked the National Park Service the question "How is Boston Township going to survive after you take 70% of our tax base?

The answer we received was "Don't worry, the development of the park will generate such interest and prestige that there will be great business development such as hotels, offices, and restaurants on the outskirts of the park in that the township will prosper greatly and more than make up for the temporary tax loss."

"In the meantime, we will see to it that you will receive "in lieu of taxes" federal funds to tide you over"

Let us take a closer look thirty- five years later:

The only large area we have that would permit such developments is what we call the State Road Corridor, which is bounded by State Route 303 on the north and Seasons Road to the south. The land in our township amounts to about 80 acres, due to massive federal land takings to the west of State Road.

A quick look at State Road will show you that our ship has not come in.

Not only that, but our township has had to spend substantial amounts of scarce tax monies to prosecute and shut down businesses that were not only ugly and unproductive, but posed physical threats to nearby residences by their operation of a huge grinding machine outside.

These types of businesses were attracted to State Road because the land was cheap due to the lack of sanitary sewers. Their presence made a bad situation worse.

Recently, there have been some encouraging developments: Sanitary sewers have now been extended to the Seasons Road State Route 8 interchange just east of State Road.

Our trustees are proactive about raising funds to extend this sewer north along State Road to Suncrest Gardens. These funds will, hopefully reduce the assessments to land owners.

We recently received a letter of support from the Summit County Council, the governing board for Summit County. This letter was the result of efforts by our trustees and Nick Kostandaras, a member of the council.

See Part III in the next Community News.

Marty Griffith





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WILL BOSTON TWP. SURVIVE? CONT`D

Martin Griffith has proposed sewers for State Road so as to collect taxes from would-be developers. One of his major points is “no developer will choose to develop here when there is plenty of land elsewhere that does have sewer.” But, one can reach the opposite conclusion with the same point.

Please consider another concept: the reason our area is so special is because it has not been developed. The lack of sewer may very well be a governing factor. With sewer we open up a Pandora’s Box of even more development.

Our people in the last election voted down a zoning decrease in acreage requirements. This was a vote against development. Our people were voting to keep the place the way it is.

George Cull, Peninsula, OH





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To the Editors:

At the May Council meeting, Mayor Fisher said that from this point forward, ALL legislation will include emergency language. Emergency language is added to legislation when there is an “urgency” to benefit the health, safety and welfare of the community.

The unfortunate caveats of emergency language are the restrictions and expenses placed on the residents to challenge the ordinance. Additionally, it expedites and allows Council to forego the normal approval process. When the smoke clears, and poorly written and contested legislation becomes a reality for the community, the residents are “personally” responsible for the entire expense of writing a new ordinance, placing it on a ballot, and bringing it to the people for a vote. Without emergency language, the Village absorbs the expense for the residents to challenge Council’s decisions – a normal constitutional process.

When an ordinance with emergency language is passed, it immediately goes into effect. Any changes to the legislation afterward are “not” retroactive. So if a loosely regulated multifamily dwelling expands in your neighborhood under new laws passed with emergency language, the expansion remains forever, unchanged, even after a hefty personal investment in attorneys and a successful ballot position overturns the ordinances.

What constitutes an emergency? Council used emergency language to pass the Village’s video recording ordinance - the most restrictive video recording rules in the state. This month they’ve even added penalties for nonconformance. This ordinance does not protect the residents. Why was it an emergency?

In addition, all zoning legislation under this administration was written with emergency language. Zoning? Emergency? Many of the changes benefit a single Councilperson’s multifamily dwelling. Although the Village opposed those changes in court for three years, many of the issues are now loaded into our zoning as emergency items. Yesterday we opposed these controversial agendas – but today they benefit the health, safety and welfare of the Village?

Now residents must question the urgency and benefit of every piece of legislation introduced by this Council. And before we can address the issues, we must debate the emergency language. This smoke screen is diverting our attention away from the real issues, as Council’s questionable legislation sneaks into our backyards.

It appears as though Council and the Mayor will stop at nothing to imbed their agenda into our codes. Are these the desires of the residents of the Village, or the needs of Council members? What’s your opinion? I look forward to hearing it during citizen participation session at the next Council meeting.

Bob Hrovat





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MOMS CLUB

The MOMS Club will host a free Kindermusik class on June 13 at 10 a.m. at the Peninsula library. The class is open to the public and geared to children between the ages of 1 and 5. Although registration is encouraged, walk-ins are welcome.

The MOMS Club, made up of mothers from Peninsula, Boston Heights, Hudson and Streetsboro, is the local chapter of a nonprofit group formed to support full-time and part-time stay-at-home mothers. Monthly activities include Moms Night Out, book club, movie nights and craft nights for the mothers, and field trips, craft projects, and play dates for the children. Yearly membership dues are $25 and most activities are free. To register for the Kindermusik class or learn more about the MOMS Club, email momsclubofhudson@hotmail.com.





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PENINSULA VALLEY HISTORIC AND EDUCATION FOUNDATION

Both the Bronson Church and G.A.R. Hall Museum will be open for FREE tours on Saturdays and Sundays from 12:00-4:00pm unless there is a private event.

We welcome you to attend our Civil War Lecture Series at the G.A.R. Hall Museum. The next lecture will be Lee, Jackson, & Longstreet - Traitors All? on Thursday, June 30 at 7:00pm. See www.peninsulahistory.org for more details.

This year's first Wine Bar at the G.A.R. will be Saturday, June 25 from 6:30-9:30pm. Live music by Acid Raincoat and complimentary hors d'oeuvres will be provided. See www.peninsulahistory.org for more information.

If you do not receive our quarterly newsletter and wish to be on our mailing list, please call 330-657-2528 or email peninsulahistory@windstream.net.





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QUARRY NEWS

A big, big thank-you to all who helped with this year’s Quarry Clean-Up. We had a great turn out – over twenty people showed up. The Quarry is all ready to open and we are planning to have the best year ever! Please plan on joining or making a generous donation this year. We open June 4 hours - are 12:30 to 7:30. This year’s activities include: Membership dive nite – So Fun; Swim Lessons in July; Fire Station fundraiser in September; Movie nite and other fun activities too! Make sure you check at the Quarry for the dates and times for these events. So make sure to join this year or come be a guest. We plan to have a great summer at the Quarry!





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GET WELL WISHES

Please keep the following in your prayers: Bonnie Sulzer, Joyce Jeric, Tommy James, Molly Peterson, Tom Rodhe, Sr., Jean Russell, Larry Shrader, Judy Getz, Jim Lockert, Gloria Ritch, Nancy Sue James Zvara, Jan Bishop and Dave Mayer.





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CONDOLENCES

Alyce (Miller) Corsino passed away April 21, 2011. Alyce lived in Peninsula for many years. She raised her six children in Peninsula and is survived by Michael, Kathy, Dave, Jeff and Don Miller and Lynda Logan in Peninsula. She was a dear friend to many and a “mother” to many kids growing up in town. She will be greatly missed by all.

Edith Minns passed away May 7, 2011. Edith was director of the Peninsula Library where she was employed for twenty-eight years. She also served as zoning secretary for Boston Township. Preceded in death by her husband Rupert and son Mark, Edith is survived by her children, Jeff, Sue Leipold, Greg, Roger, and Mariedith Massey, eleven grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.





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OUR VALLEY’S TOUGH DAFFODILS

Daffodils are tougher than I had originally thought. This is because there are some former structures that have been purchased, demolished & removed by the federal government, but yet the persistent daffodils continue to come up. To me it seems as though they are saying “don’t forget that someone planted me here” which is a sober reminder to us who remain that there used to be people that wanted to live at that location.

I appreciated Joanne’s article last month ("History Is Written by the Victors") because she outlines the process of how the Fed’s took most of Boston Township. I want to expand on a few of those items that she included.

Yes, I realize that there are some who sold their property thinking that is would further some “noble cause”. But as my neighbor is fond of saying “follow the money” which is true in this and most cases also. I have a feeling that if the money vaporized, so would the “noble cause.” As it is with numerous items handled by the federal government, what starts out as one thing usually changes course and not necessarily for the better. It is, in my opinion, due to three major things; money, power & lack of empathy to the people the federal government are impacting.

The changing vision for the valley creates confusion with what they say is important and what actually is done. One original idea was to have mostly preservation (or scenic) easements with the residents. Another idea is to have it become wilderness areas. Another idea is to focus on the towpath. Yet another idea is to lease back farms or put in overnight camping.

The recent moves toward recognition that the valley was originally developed and used by people and should be turned back to people who use it productively seem to me a good move. Hopefully that will come with the acknowledgment that those who are living in and using the valley ought to contribute in a tangible way to the privilege of living here. Of course as a homeowner and taxpayer, I would like to see the homes and land returned to paying their fair share of taxes to the township. It may seem like a stretch, but those lands could be sold back with preservation easements so that the government could still monitor compliance, but yet they would be relieved of two funding issues; maintenance of their properties and not having to allocate funding that is necessary for helping the Township. The Township funds would be more than made up by the taxes that would start coming back in from the property tax roles. I think it could be a win-win. If you have any comments send them to ray.hach@juno.com.

For the common good.
Ray Hach





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WANT ADS

WANTED: 250 gal. fuel oil tank. If you have one you could donate please contact YCN at 330-657-2439.

HOUSE FOR SALE: Richfield- 2 bedrm, 1 bath, kit, living rm, dining rm., wood floors, attached garage, barn, storage cottage on 2 acres, fenced pasture. Small orchard with apple, cherry and pear trees. Revere schools 330-659-4748.

FOR SALE: Heavy Lawn Roller $40 call Jeanette at 330-650-4355

FOR SALE: Howard Miller grandfather clock, model 610-895, “Jonathan”, 4 years old. Asking $1250.00 or reasonable offer. Call Ray at 216-402-9511.

CHILD CARE in my Peninsula Home: Licensed Practical Nurse wants to watch your children. Full-time, Part-time, and summer available. References available. Call Lori at (330) 657-4019

FREE horse manure for your garden. Will load your truck Balogh’s horse boarding 330-659-4748

GARDENING: Local organic gardener is available for all your gardening needs. Call Patty at 330-657-4015.

BED AND BREAKFAST: For the convenience of local folks only, Peninsula Bed and Breakfast is available for your overflow guests. Call 330-657-2284.

SUMMER CHILD CARE: Stay at home mom in Peninsula available to watch your child this summer in my home. If interested call 330-657-2082

FOR SALE: Cypress wood cross section - coffee table, has center design with beaut stones, 38"x32"x14"hi. Noritake china set, serv.12, great wedding gift. Call Linda 330-657-2360.

FOR SALE: 1993 trailer home in Indian Springs, Cuyahoga Falls, and Revere School District. 3 BR, 2 bath with central air. Asking $25,000. Call 216-410-7868.

FOR SALE: Mobile home in Hudson Estates. Two bedrooms with one bath. $7,500. Call Ashley at 330-998-9316, leave message and I will return your call.

HOT TUB FOR SALE: Seats 4-6 people. Has not been used in 15 years. Asking $350 or best offer. Call 1-800-750-0750 or 657-2312 after 7:00PM.

COMMERCIAL/OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE: Beautiful and spacious 1115 sq.ft. office space available for lease in the upper level of the Boston Township Hall (1887 Schoolhouse). For additional information or an appointment, call 330-657-2842 (please leave a message).

LICKITY-SPLIT: Tree cutting and wood splitting. Call Scott Ensign at 330-657-2462.





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SERVICES

GREEN CLEANING, DOG WALKING, AND MUCH MORE: Local company seeking new clients. We offer Personal Service, Green Cleaning, Pet Services, and a lot more. Call Neal @330.606.9498 or to learn more visit www.contemporarylivingservices.com

LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHER: Sant' Agata Photos www.santagataphotos.com OR santagataphotos@aol.com For all photography needs: newborns, graduates, weddings etc. Resident discount.

PROPERTY AND FREE STANDING BUILDING FOR SALE: 4,000 Square Ft. Freestanding Building. Zoned Industrial with Flexible Permit Use. Metal Construction. Two (2) 10' x 14' Doors. 1.58 Acres. 3 Phase Electric. Gas Heat. Partially Secured Yard. 6 in. Concrete Floors. Proximity to: CVNP, Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad Depot, Ohio and Erie Canal Lock 29, Towpath Trail, Art Galleries and Shops, Peninsula Art Academy, BMBW Ski Resorts, Brandywine Golf Course, and many other attractions. Call 330.697.5079

DONATE YOUR OLD COMPUTER FOR A GOOD CAUSE: Donate your old computer or broken computer parts made 1/01/2000 or newer. This equipment will be used to teach underprivileged kids how to repair computers. For more details call 440.665.0008

KEVIN STONE PHOTOGRAPHY: Offering quality services for families, couples, seniors and other events. Call 330687-4262 WWW.KWSTPHOTO.CO.NT

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Chiarle Construction and J.C. Deck Masters is available for all of your construction and landscape needs. Free estimates. Call John at 330-329-8389 or 330-328-2045.

LICENSED ELECTRICIAN: Peninsula Resident offers high quality electrical work with a discount to Peninsula residents. Call Steve at 330-310-1061 www.missionelectricohio.com

PLYMOUTH MEMORIAL: Cemetery markers and monuments. Located at 5095 Akron-Cleveland Road. Call 330-650-1545.

WEDDING AND PARTY HELP: Are you planning a party or wedding? If so I can help! I can take care of as much or as little as you would like. Fees are based upon what is needed. References and pictures available. Emily Holody 330-256-6641

Q-BALL WELDING & SONS: We will take care of all your fabrications and welding needs. Jeff Plymire 330-618-4255.

STONE AND BRICK PATIOS AND WALKWAYS: Local and reliable. Please call for more information and quotes. Jason Mays 330-714-5387.

EXCAVATION WORK: 25 years exp. Utility installation, repair and upgrades. Landscaping, hardscapes and concrete. Foundation installation and repairs, etc. Booth Excavating 330-573-8875/330-657-2244. YARD REFUSE

BIG FRANK’S STUMP GRINDING SERVICE: Prompt service, free onsite estimates, seven days a week. Portable unit fits through a 36” opening. Call Frank Grezlik at 330-281-1280.

TREE/WOOD REMOVAL: If you have a tree to take down or wood to get rid of (no rotten wood) please give me a call. I need firewood. Call Matt at 330-657-2138.

VALLEY ROOF REPAIR & HOME MAINTENANCE: Bonded and insured. No job too small. Call Rick at 330-322-7996.

CHAIR REPAIR: including cane, rush and splint seat weaving. 35 years experience. Call David Shankland at 330-467-6772.

ROSARIES: Beautiful handmade one-of-a-kind rosaries. Handcast centers and crucifixes. Colors are the shopper’s choice. Great gifts for Christmas, Baptisms, birthdays, First Communion and Confirmations. Some rosaries are on display at the Peninsula Art Academy. Call Mary Anne at MAD Creations, 657-2085.

TREE TRIMMING: No job too small. Call Tom Godlewski 330-650-9678.

LEGAL SERVICES: Local resident, Heather R. Dyer, is available to provide legal services. Call 330-657-2029.

CUSTOM RESTORATION: Custom wood trim, plaster and drywall repair, sash, door and hardware, century home restoration. Call Dan Torowski at 330-659-0055

VILLAGE HANDY: Remodeling, carpentry, tile, general plumbing & electrical. Call Buddy Milhoan at 657-2699.

OUTDOOR STORAGE AND PARKING: Affordable, secure, and convenient for boats, recreational vehicles and automobiles now available at the Virginia Motel. Call today 330-342-0864.

WESTERN RESERVE RENOVATIONS: Home repairs, improvements and renovations. Peninsula local, insured and bonded. Call for free quote. Jason Klein 330-221-3461.

SILHOUETTES: Children’s silhouettes from your photos or mine $15.00. Black paper cut on white background that fits an 8x10 frame. Samples available. Call Lois Unger at 657- 2385.

HOME CARE SERVICES: Providing trusted reliable, affordable, courteous home care service for elderly. Bonded and insured. Richard Pivovar at 330-668-1051.