If you want to know
what a man's like,
take a good look at how he
treats his inferiors,
not his equals.

J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
June 2020 VOLUME 37 NUMBER 6



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RICHARD FISHER

former Mayor and Councilman Richard Fisher
Councilman Dan Schneider, Sr., Mayor Dan Schneider, Jr. and former Mayor and Councilman Richard Fisher

On June 19, 2020 Dick Fisher was presented with a proclamation that recognized his years of outstanding leadership, dedicated service, and cherished friendship to the Village of Peninsula and community.

Dick served on Peninsula Village Council from January 1976 through December 1979. He was Mayor of Peninsula from January 1980 through December 1987 and from January 2008 through December 2011.





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BOSTON TOWNSHIP

The township minutes are posted on our website at www.bostontownship.org and outside the fiscal office at the Boston Township Hall. Trustee meetings are the second and fourth Wednesday of the month. Zoning commission meets the second Tuesday of the month and the Board of Zoning Appeals meets the fourth Tuesday of the month.

Road Department: Recent incidents of high intensity rainstorms have highlighted areas in the community where improvements may be needed to drainage systems. Currently under review is the Morris/Woodland area. The damage that was done to Riverview Road north of 303 has made it very difficult for many in the community to get around. Access to the township property is being maintained from 303, but no through traffic is permitted. As a result of the fire at the Peninsula road garage in January 2019, the village road crew have been operating from the township road garage under a lease agreement. At the meeting held May 27, the trustees agreed to extend the lease agreement with the village through September 30, 2020.

Police Levy: The township`s police levy will be expiring at the end of 2020. The trustees have asked the Summit County Fiscal Office to certify the total tax valuation for a renewal of the current 7 mill, 5-year police levy. Also, for informational purposes, the trustees asked for the Fiscal Office to certify the total tax valuation for an additional 2 mill, 5-year levy.

Zoning: Zoning Inspector John Schneider reported that on June 10 a meeting was held at the commercial property at 5649 Akron-Cleveland Road to discuss violations to the conditional use permit for the property. At the meeting with Schneider was the township solicitor, township zoning liaison, representatives of the Valley Fire District, the property owner and the property owner`s legal counsel.

Zoning Meetings: Out of necessity, Zoning Commission and Board of Zoning Appeals meetings were put on hiatus due to the COVID-19 crisis. However, as there have been some inquiries and applications waiting, the trustees will discuss ways to proceed with zoning matters at their meeting on June 24.

WEBSITE: Visit our Website at www.bostontownship.org to find up-to-date Township information. Contact numbers for the Trustees: Amy Anderson: 330-657-2439, Randy Bergdorf: 330-655-5698, and Bill Clifton: 330-657-4032. Fiscal Officer: Catherine Anson at 330-657-2059; Road Department: Dave Krusinski at 330-657-2600; and Zoning Inspector: Dan Schneider at 330-657-2601 or 234-900-9145.





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PENINSULA COUNCIL

Village Council met in an Electronic Meeting Format for the Regular Council Session Via Zoom Meeting June 8, 2020.

May 11, 2020 Regular Council Meeting Minutes were presented and passed as written.

Council passed Resolution 07-2020 A Resolution directing the Summit County Board of Elections to place a 3 Mill, Five Year, Road tax renewal levy on the November 3, 2020 General Election ballot.

Council passed Resolution 09-2020 A Joint Resolution authorizing the continuance of the One Mill Cemetery Maintenance Tax for the Village of Peninsula and Boston Township Union Cemetery Association.

Council passed Resolution 10-2020 A Resolution authorizing certain Amendments, Transfers, and or Revenue Adjustments to the 2020 Appropriation Resolution.

Council passed Resolution 12-2020 A Resolution Directing the certification of property demolition and removal costs to the county Fiscal Officer for placement on the Tax Duplicate.

Mayor Dan Schneider announced the bridge on Riverview Road will be closed until Summit County repairs the bridge.

Boston Township Trustees were invited to the Council Meeting and voted and passed to continue the One Mill Tax Levy for Cemetery Operations.

Police Chief Varga announced they are accepting applications for part-time police officers.

Mayor Schneider reminds everyone that if you are planning to remodel your home, new roof, install a fence or retaining wall you will need a building permit. Please call 330-657-2151 for more information.

2020 Census: Households have received official Census Bureau mail with detailed information on how to respond to the 2020 Census online, by phone, or by mail. We encourage you to respond as soon as you can. Accurate information directly affects the quality of life in your community.

Reminder to our residents, that it is your responsibility to keep your ditches and driveway culverts clear.

Upcoming Meetings:
Council Meeting July 13, 2020 at 7:00PM Pending Electronic Meeting Via Zoom

Contact Phone Numbers:
Administrative Office 330-657-2151
Non-Emergency Police & Fire 330-657-2911

Check the Website: www.villageofpeninsula-oh.gov

Marty Kuboff, Administrative Assistant





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FOURTH OF JULY 2020

How and why did you or your family come to these United States and how did you come to where YCN is delivered to your mailbox? What are your roots? Whatever your response, hopefully it will include for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Yet, this has been challenged by COVID-19 and an awareness of the profiling in this the land of the free. By cooperating with recommendations from medical professionals and civil leaderships the pandemic of COVID-19 is becoming less problematic to our freedom of life. Profiling is still inhibiting liberty and the pursuit of happiness. While there is a new vigor to address this injustice, each one of us living in the land of the free needs to reflect on our own attitude and actions toward others. We believe that each and every human being is to be respected and appreciated. Then, ask yourself, "How am I hearing what is happening this year 2020, as Independence Day is being marked?" "What can I do to end profiling and anything else that opposes what we pledge before "the red, white and blue" for all in a nation diverse in many ways, yet sharing the same humanity?" "One nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all." (from pledge of allegiance).

Father John Terzano, Mother of Sorrows





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IN MEMORY OF THOSE WE HAVE LOST

2020… a year we have all had to adjust to. Social distancing, face masks, zoom meetings, no group or family gatherings, no hugging. Truly a difficult time for all. But some things remain the same. Although the Peninsula Home and Garden Club has suspended all monthly gatherings during the unknowns of this pandemic, we continue our work to beautify the Village. Each spring, the ladies of Garden Club purchase and plant the flowers for the fourteen boxes on the Main Street bridge. Member Polly Rutledge and her husband Bob have for years, faithfully mounted the twelve American flags. All this we do as a memorial to friends, neighbors, and loved ones from our community who have passed. We invite you to take your next evening stroll across the Peninsula Main Street bridge, pause for a few minutes to admire the plantings, remembering and honoring all those we have lost.

Dee Holody





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To the Editors:

The Village website contains an April letter from Ohio EPA that says, "We understand that the Village plans to have a public meeting soon to discuss these options [septic enforcement v. centralized sewer] with their residents and are encouraged by these developments."

Maybe we blinked, because it looks like the "public meeting" the EPA expected has come and gone.

In their April meeting, Council`s Wastewater Committee (Weygandt, Kaplan and Krusinski) presented their assessment of the septic/sewer pros and cons in a PowerPoint they had developed. They agreed to invite public comment on their work for 30 days. They courteously did so in May`s edition of Your Community News, but closed the comment period just after the YCN was delivered. By the time they adopted their meeting minutes a few days later, the deadline they`d included in those minutes had already passed.

So -- their Final PowerPoint is now on the Village website -- along with another "Final PowerPoint 2" containing only Committee additions. Odd, since they never discussed those additions in any meeting thereafter.

But odder still, this additionally final, final document includes nothing about the risks of development — the risks that both the EPA and the Health Dept suggested we discuss as a community when they addressed the village publicly in May of 2018. Instead of a public discussion about development, Council authorized a meeting with the County`s sewer department at its last meeting, with this final final claim of our community`s thinking in hand.

Until the past two months` mockery of public input, I`d wanted to take no position on sanitation enforcement v. centralized sewer, hoping to avoid the angst that even asking for open data and deliberations seems to create. But this kind of backdoor decision-making is a risk to us all. If we can`t acknowledge all of the disadvantages of centralized sewer, how can Planning effectively mitigate against them? And If we can`t deliberate our decisions openly, how can we expect to defend them against the kind of development that even sewer proponents will abhor?

Kathy Bertsch





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To the Editors:

Regarding the septic vs sewer issue in the Village, I`m most concerned about the Village`s processes, transparency and notice to residents. These issues are the focus of a separate letter in this issue of YCN from my wife, Kathy Bertsch.

Sewer may be the best technical option for compliance, and it has some advantages I personally find desirable. However, it likely isn`t the best option for those residents who cannot afford approximately $5,000 in upfront cost (connection + septic decommissioning), as well as increased property taxes to cover the anticipated $15,000 fixed costs and expected increases in property values. Somehow, the Wastewater Committee characterized this up-front cost that cannot be spread over 20 — 30 years of tax bills as an advantage of a central sewer system.

Sewer would likely accelerate the slow gentrification process that has been going on for a few decades, driving out the last of our neighbors of lesser means. There appears to be no financial assistance available for sewer the way there is for septic. Finding financial assistance for these residents should be a priority if sewer moves forward.

Finally, I`m concerned about the impact of the ensuing development that sewers will have on residents. Not just to those of us who live in "ground zero," but everyone who tries to drive through town on a busy weekend dealing with increased traffic, even less available parking, traffic jams at the lights, lack of sidewalks in key areas, etc.

Sewer is clearly being done to support commercial development, but we still haven`t had any discussion about what that means from the supporters of sewer. While I hope their plans are reasonably compatible with residential life, I fear that our struggles with process and transparency will enable a hostile developer to eat our lunch.

Richard Slocum





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PENINSULA LIBRARY NEWS

Library Reopening: The Peninsula Library reopened in a "modified curbside" mode on June 1. By opening up our new vestibule, patrons can return items, check out new items, and place reserves for materials. At the moment, the statewide library delivery service is set to resume on June 29 at which time they will first process the immense backlog which occurred when libraries closed state-wide in March. After that, the resumption of inter-library loan requests will start. For the time being, Peninsula patrons can place holds only on Peninsula-owned materials from home, but by calling in to the library staff can place holds on all materials for delivery at a later date. Health guidelines require libraries to place all returned items in quarantine for at least three days. We are constantly monitoring state and federal guidelines to determine when it will be allowable for patrons to come into the library for browsing the collection. At this time it is not known when it will be possible to hold programs in the library. Currently the library is open Monday through Friday from 10:00AM to 6:00PM. To reach the library, please call us at (330) 657-2665 or email us at info@peninsulalibrary.org . Please look for us on Facebook or visit our website for updated information (peninsulalibrary.org).

Summer Reading Club: "Imagine Your Story" is the theme for this summer`s reading program for ages 2-17. Sadly, we will not be able to meet together in our library for programs and popcorn, however we have been working hard to provide you with some fun things to do at home! Call (330-657-2665) or e-mail info@peninsulalibrary.org to register. There will be NO in-person registration. Registered patrons may pick up weekly projects, crafts, or activities beginning Monday, June 8 (10:00AM to 6:00PM Mon-Fri.) through Friday, July 10. You will also be provided links to access virtual performances tailored to our library from:
  • Chip Richter—family concert (available 30 days)
  • Jim Kleefeld-magic (available 72 hrs.)
  • Tom Sieling -family concert (TBD)
  • Akron Zoo (June 30 live 10:30am)

YOU WILL BE NOTIFIED VIA E-MAIL WITH INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW AND WHEN TO ACCESS THESE PERFORMANCES. Don`t forget to call or go online to place holds for pick-up of great children`s books—or give us a theme and check out the "Librarian`s choice" bag of books for your enjoyment and learning!

Summer Reading Club for Adults: The 2020 Summer Reading Club theme for Adults is Imagine your Story. We will take a different approach to summer reading club this year with a 15 book reading challenge. Even though the library may not be fully open, we can still get books for you to read. You can call the library at 330-657-2665 or email the library at info@peninsulalibrary.org to request books, movies, audio and magazines. Imagine your Story this summer with this 15 book reading challenge for ages 18+ beginning on Monday June 1. Write down what you read for each prompt; eBooks & audiobooks count just like a print book. Turn in this completed sheet by August 14 for a chance to win a $50 gift card to Fisher`s Café or $50 gift card to Winking Lizard, five runners-up will have a chance for a $10 gift card to Country Maid Ice Cream. Feel free to email reviews of your books to info@peninsulalibrary.org. Reading Challenge forms are available at the library or by going to the link below:
https://peninsulalibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/SRC-2020-15-book-challenge-PDF.pdf





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BIRTHDAY WISHES

Happy Birthday wished to Marjorie Morgan who will be celebrating 98 years on July 17.





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PENINSULA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

We miss coming together for weekly services! We are making plans to open the church building in the future, and we are tentatively hosting an outdoor tent service on the church lawn on Sunday, July 12, at 9:00AM, if weather permits. Please join us!





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PENINSULA MIX

Due to the cancellation of the Memorial Day Parade in May we decided to look at some of the pictures we have collected over the years. In one of the pictures, near the World War II memorial was a picture that included Mark Biro. Mark always drove a Jeep in the parade. Mark grew up living on the Biro farm on Akron Peninsula Road. This farm as well as the home of his parents and aunts and uncles is now in the hand of the federal government. Mark went to Boston/Boston Northampton/ Woodridge school system and as an adult he lived in Northampton. Many of you may have noticed his craftmanship ability if you visited the Quarry Room in the Boston Township School or the Boston Township meeting room. A few years back, Mark moved to Merritt Island, Florida where he is happily enjoying retirement. During his travels in Florida Mark happened across the Valiant Air Command, Warbird Museum in Titusville, Florida. Mark now spends time restoring Huey helicopters as he did while serving in Vietnam.

Congratulations to Peninsula resident Anthony Bruce who earned a degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Akron. An ad for a certified mechanic has been in the YCN service ads for at least eight years while Anthony was going to school. Anthony has moved on and hopes to own his own engineering firm and manufacturing facility. Best wishes Anthony.

Congratulations to Peninsula Police officer Shelby Nofsinger. On May 19 Shelby joined the ranks as part-time officer of Richfield`s police department.

If you can identify the item in the picture, please contact Dean Johnson at 234-226-7141.
what is this?


Amy Anderson





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ERROR... article unavailable in 'View All' mode. [article 20200612]





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PENINSULA`S MASS HOUSE & A CORONA VIRUS

By Ed Andros

Twenty years ago next Summer our community came together on behalf of the Peninsula Library & Historical Society. The occasion was the first of two Home & Garden Tours that were conducted to raise money toward what was then a very modest endowment. Jurate and I had not yet had time to do much with either the garden or the house, but had by that stage gathered many stories to tell about the owners who had come before us. It was around then we began to learn that simply calling our home the Garvey House did not do it justice.

The original structure was larger than a typical residence because it was meant to serve as the New Academy at Peninsula. A board of local Anglicans and Presbyterians was formed to direct its operation as a private, secondary school. The year it was built, the Ohio legislature required public schools to provide secondary education. Despite my best efforts I have failed to uncover any evidence of teachers, students or other hints that it ever actually operated as a school in 1851 or at any time thereafter.

What Jurate and I did discover was that an Irish couple living in Brecksville purchased our house in 1872. They owned a farm that lay astride the only route for a railroad to take from Cleveland to Akron. The Vaughns chose to include themselves among perhaps fewer than a dozen Irish families who formed the core of the Catholic community in Boston Township. This photo shows their large home on Vaughn Road, just beyond the rail crossing around 1902.

1902 Vaughn Road

Any Irish Catholic born in the early decades of the 19th century, just after English laws prohibiting priests from saying Mass in public were rescinded, were familiar with a simple solution to not having a church.
The alternative venue for Mass was in people`s homes. Word was put about locally that Mass would be said in a particular house on a particular day. The neighbours would gather for what was often the only opportunity to be at Mass for a long time… This Mass became known as the "station Mass" because of the random movement from place to place. In some areas, some houses became known locally as regular venues for Mass and became known as Mass houses. More of these emerged as the Penal Laws were repealed but the Catholic community still did not have resources to build enough churches. [From the Diocese of Cork and Ross < https://corkandross.org/the-station-mass/> accessed on 30 May 2020] 1

From an early time we suspected that our home had served as a Mass house.
Even when each community built its own church building, the Station tradition was kept alive. The two-part focus of having the celebration of Mass in one`s home and an occasion for special hospitality to the neighbours combined to highlight two key strands of the Catholic faith in Ireland. Until the 1970s, the Station Mass was always held in the morning and was followed by "breakfast" for the priest and neighbours. The Station was preceded by weeks of preparation including painting, wall-papering, cleaning and shopping! [Ibid]

The following entry is from a small notebook kept by my grandfather. It was found in the farmhouse at Kilcloony by the Killure bog in County Galway where he passed all 86 years of his life, as his grandfather had before him. They shared the same name, which was John Carroll.
ALT NAME


Celebrating Station Masses may have continued in Boston Township after a church was built in 1882. Such is the practice still alive in Ireland and the reason for a diocese to publish a description of the evolving practice on its webpage.

However the practice may have changed after 1882, it would have been from among the rota of Stationers that godparents for Baptisms, sponsors for Confirmations, even spouses to marry would be found by the township`s catholic residents. Eight years after a Catholic church was built and dedicated to Mater Dolorosa, Margaret and Richard Vaughn sold their property at Peninsula to a younger, catholic couple and retired from their farm. The farm they left in the possession of their son Edward. They took up residence with Daniel and Mary Garvey.

A year later the Akron Beacon ran this front-page account above the fold concerning deaths reported to have taken place on May 1 and May 3 1891:
Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn had been troubled with the grip3 of late and last Friday Mrs. Vaughn died at the age of 80 years. Her Husband, 78 years of age, at this time was also a very sick man, but contended with his family, who had been present at the death bed of his wife, that he was not seriously ill and would soon recover. Sunday2 morning he arose from bed and went to the breakfast table at 6:30 o`clock. With his family gathered around him the old gentleman suddenly exclaimed, `I am gone!" And without uttering another word died in the arms of one of his children.

In the aftermath of the Vaughns` passing, the family arranged to have a memorial panel in stained glass dedicated to their parents placed behind the altar at what is now known as Mother of Sorrows.

Vaughan Stained Glass

The close relationship between the Vaughns and Garveys is difficult to explain in the absence of some connection not known to us today. A possible explanation may be that in 1860, Mary`s Irish immigrant parents had prevailed upon the Vaughns to become their daughter`s godparents. When Cornelius Ingerton left Winnie a widow with five children perhaps Margaret employed Mary and her sister Anne to work at Margaret`s Peninsula boarding house. For the 1880 Census, the Ingerton children were all living still with their mother. A son was a laborer and the two older girls were recorded to be working as domestics by the Census.

Something closer than a business relationship may explain how Mary`s Irish-born husband Daniel Garvey was able to rise from being a 22 year-old laborer in 1880 to owning both a saloon and the Vaughns` boarding house within a decade. In 19th century America the one socially acceptable business for women to direct was a boarding establishment. Perhaps Winnie Ingerton was engaged as the Vaughn`s first housekeeper, followed by Mary when she wed in 1880.

Daniel and Mary built a barn for dairy cows. This came at a time when Peninsula was involved in cheese making. They also owned a farm later owned by a descendant of the Vaughns whose surname was Balinski. Today it is called the Spicey Lamb Farm. Thus, by 1896, the range of Garvey activities included dairy farming, a saloon and a boarding house that was probably allied with the Cassidy Hotel. The hotel stood on Main Street near the Ohio & Erie Canal and Valley Rail line. Daniel`s saloon was directly across the street. It would later become Scotty`s Bar & Grill, operated by Mary`s nephew Scotty Ingerton.4 Today it is the home of Century Cycles.

1910

The wing on the right of the photo taken around 1910 was probably added by the Vaughns during its use as a Mass house. It was in the kitchen wall that during renovations Jurate recovered a photo of the 14 year-old boy pictured above. The year was 1902 and Leo Garvey was photographed with his class. They were arrayed with their teacher across the steps of the present Boston Township Hall.
LeoGarvey

The Archivist of the Cleveland diocese helped me locate an 1887 account describing efforts to establish Mother of Sorrows parish. I knew Christine Kroesel because we attended John Carroll University together. It`s worth noting Leo also attended John Carroll, but in 1914 it was called Ignatius College and the college`s campus in Ohio City later became St. Ignatius High School.

Some of the Irish family names listed in the Pfeil Manuscript can be found on markers in Mater Dolorosa cemetery two miles from the center of our village. The Vaughns are not among them. They, the Garveys and Ingertons are buried in Akron`s pre-eminent St. Vincent`s Cemetery. The Vaughn`s cast bronze monument is noteworthy.

-----------------
1 Please note how this author`s surname of Andros has been cleverly embedded in the internet address for the Diocese for Cork and Ross.

2 By coincidence, May 1, 2020 also fell on a Friday.

3 Grip was a commonly used 19th century term for influenza. A so-called Russian Flu pandemic took 1 million lives worldwide between 1889 and 1896. Recent research by paleopathologists suggests that an extinct corona virus (the ancestor of the present human coronavirus OC43) may have been the culprit in 1889. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1889%E2%70%931890_flu_pandemic

4 Ingerton is the only Peninsula resident ever to play major league baseball. Scotty played in 1911 for the Boston team that would change its name to the Boston Braves in 1912. His younger cousin played on Peninsula`s championship 1923 team under Scotty`s leadership. In this photo taken in 1914 at the Bedford Glens ball field Leo Garvey sits wearing a straw boater with 8 of 9 Freshmen representing Ignatius College.

1914 ball team





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SERVICES

From the Editors: Have you used any of these services? We are asking for your feedback in rating them from one to five with five being excellent.

TREE TRIMMING: Tree trimming, storm clean-up, general clean-up. Call Tom the Tree Guy at 330-760-4105.

SONSHINE CLEANING SERVICE: Residential (including Apartments), Commercial, Offices, Floors, Walls, Windows, Bathrooms, etc. $10 off first cleaning and $10 off for every referral that uses us. Three hour minimum please. Please contact Claudia Norris at (440) 915-9957. Local references available.

LICENSED ELECTRICIAN- Peninsula resident. Great rates/Quick service. Call Steve at 330-310-1061. Ohio license #El22934.

COMPANION SERVICES: Are you a senior seeking senior companion services? Well, help is here. Call Kimberly for more details. 330-285-6962

REAL ESTATE SERVICES: Your hometown Real Estate agent, looking to buy or sell your home call us. Sylvia Tonhaeuser/ Robin Shrader Remax Trends 330-329-1851. No one knows Peninsula or Boston Township better.

PROJECT FEEDING KIDS: Find the best prices for every essential service, both residential and commercial while helping feed children in the community. We work with top brands, such as DirecTv, Dish, AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, gas, electric, and merchant services. Call Kelly at 330-203- 9713.

CARPET, RUG, UPHOLSTERY & TILE CLEANING: Citrus-based green cleaning system. Safe for children and pets. No residue and dries in a few hours. Offer 20% discount includes moving couch and chairs. Contact Sandy or Jim Sadens at 330-657-2113 CitrusGreenClean.com Email us at sadens.jim@gmail.com.
YCN reader rating of 5, multiple community comments.

NEED A HAND? CALL THE HANDYMAN! Bath resident, Joshua Kastelic 15+ years experience. Honest, Quality, On-Time 330-289-8181 thehandyman_can@rocketmail.com
YCN reader rating of 5, reporter has used this service multiple times.

PET SITTING IN YOUR HOME: For all your pet sitting needs, contact Precious Pets Sitting Service at 216-701-4181. Providing visits, midday walks, and overnight service since 1997. Rates start $15/day, insured/bonded, Veterinary Technician.

PHOTOGRAPHER: Your photographer neighbor. www.KelleyWeitzelPhotography.com For all photography needs.

LICKITY-SPLIT: Firewood, tree cutting and wood splitting. Call Scott Ensign at 330-657-2462.

ALEXANDER WATER: 330-923-0014.

CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING: Award-winning custom picture framing since 1992, with framing consultations at your home or office, delivery and installation. Instruction with social media and marketing. Fine Art Services - Assisting artists, designers, corporate & residential clients in the selection, display and proper framing of art. 330-657-2228.
YCN reader rating of: 5 Star Rating! I have used Carolyn to frame, reframe, and repair all sorts of art for me and she does a professional job.
YCN reader rating of: 5 Star Rating! Wonderful work and very creative. Highly recommended.


SAWMILL SERVICE: From firewood to tree removal, all the way to decks, porches, & more. We do it all, give me a call! Wells Construction/S & S Sawmill, Seth, (330) 352-0210.
YCN reader rating of 5, reporter very pleased with services.

FOR SALE: End Tables and Coffee Tables. Eye-Catching, Locally Sourced Hardwoods. Handmade in Boston Township. Visit StudioJoe.us.